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Late night mograph. I was working on a problem earlier today, how to make a more 3-dimensional plexus animation, and came up with an answer. Didn't really look that interesting so I turned up the complexity until it did.

In retrospect, I think I've got a much easier way to accomplish it, but oh well. Also, this absolutely eats video compression for breakfast.

Me: This'll be easy. I just plug this into that, and bam! It'll work.
2 hours later:

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Afternoon mograph. I revisited a concept from a week or two back, intent on twisting a surface rather than distorting it with noise. Of course, what seemed pretty simple in my head ended up being a little harder in practice. But hey, it works. Mostly. Except the way it skips across the surface unevenly.

Here's the previous version, for reference: mastodon.art/@cjrando/10828106

foul language 

Friday night mograph. I started a tutorial earlier, saw the effect they were teaching, and decided to figure it out on my own. I'm just very much that kind of person.

The basis of my version is a Musgrave texture, the map range node, and a bit of ol' fashioned particle physics.

Not real crazy about Blender's bounce f-curve. Will have to figure out some other methods for that eventually.

If you're just getting into Geometry Nodes, a good place to start would be as a replacement for the Array Modifier. That's a tool I think most folks use, and it can be a little confusing and clumsy, honestly.

Geometry Nodes can be much more straightforward. As a project, this also introduces you to two key concepts: points and instances.

You give it points (vertices, generally), and then instance (duplicate) on those points.

【场景&概念设计】【Scene & Concept Design】
金属玻璃皮革 丨 Metal, Glass, Fabric
规则有机几何 丨 Rule, Organization, Cubism
形式功能艺术 丨 Form, Feature,
偏不重复 丨 No way to repeat

-design

drawing while waiting for the washing machine to finish. Laundry on Sunday is my least favorite thing.

Halp. My cat has extra cattitude today. If I'm interpreting his noises correctly, he would like to speak with my manager.

Last year I bought some well known modeling add-ons for Blender after a lot of consideration, and a few days back I just finally uninstalled them. Not sure why but I just never got on well with their workflow, and I didn't like that they made a bunch of changes to the keymap and made Blender launch slower.

I've watched people do really cool things with them, but every time I tried to use them, I just dragged things around a bit, went "That's cool," and then went about my business.

Late night mograph/vfx. I've been playing a Star Wars game recently and realized I've never really taken a crack at their "jump to hyperspace" effect, so I went after it tonight. This was probably an hour or two. Could use a bit of polish still, and a planet appearing very suddenly at the end, but it's not bad.

Late night mograph/vfx. I've been playing a Star Wars game recently and realized I've never really taken a crack at their "jump to hyperspace" effect, so I went after it tonight. This was probably an hour or two. Could use a bit of polish still, and a planet appearing very suddenly at the end, but it's not bad.

Afternoon mograph. Still playing with similar noise patterns as last night, and put together this little turnaround while I was at it.

In Blender's Geometry Nodes, this is what it means to be an instance. An instance, like an object, has its own origin point, which establishes its own grid.

Examples can also be found in Shader Nodes. For example, the difference between the Generated and Object texture coordinates is where they locate their origin point. Generated puts 0,0,0 at the lower left front corner, while Object places it at the center.

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Things get a little more interesting when you discover that one grid can be embedded inside of another. "Hey, that point over there... 5,3,-1... that's now 0,0,0 for its own baby grid."

In Blender, this is what it means for something to be an "object". It has its own origin point, which you'll recognize as the little orange dots that objects rotate around.

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When working in 3D space (and especially with procedural work), one point is unique and more important than any other — the origin point, 0,0,0.

It establishes a grid, and everything else exists in relation to that point. A set of coordinates are just instructions, describing how to get there from 0,0,0.

I think students would be way more into linear algebra if 1) the subject were taught in the context of 3D graphics, and 2) they were allowed to smoke just epic quantities of weed.

"What are NURBS? Well, you know what vectors are. NURBS are basically vectors in 3D."

It's not wrong, but it's not particularly right either. It misses that a polygonal mesh is -also- vectors in 3D. The primary difference is in how they're interpolated.

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