authentic

Pronunciation /ɔːˈθɛntɪk/
adjective
1 Of undisputed origin and not a copy; genuine.
1.1 Made or done in the traditional or original way, or in a way that faithfully resembles an original.
1.2 Based on facts; accurate or reliable.

Origin
Late Middle English via Old French from late Latin authenticus, from Greek authentikos ‘principal, genuine’.
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The following image is authentic and original...also CC0 dedicated. Reconcile that!

durst

Pronunciation /dəːst/
verb
past
archaic or regional past of dare

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Flick's friends double-dog durst him to touch his tongue to the flagpole in Jean Shepherd's movie, "A Christmas Story".

(Yeah, I know, it was a *double-dog dare*. Don't be so picky. I need to bend reality from time to time for these silly sample sentences.)

ascetic

Pronunciation /əˈsɛtɪk/
adjective
Characterized by severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons.
noun
A person who follows an ascetic life.

Origin
Mid 17th century from medieval Latin asceticus or Greek askētikos, from askētēs ‘monk’, from askein ‘to exercise’.

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Bob totally knew that he was not destined to seek out an ascetic life.



impede

Pronunciation /ɪmˈpiːd/
verb
[with object]
Delay or prevent (someone or something) by obstructing them; hinder.

Origin
Late 16th century from Latin impedire ‘shackle the feet of’, based on pes, ped- ‘foot’. Compare with impeach.

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Do not impede me, I implore you, but if you must, be fair about controlling others, too.

delve

Pronunciation /dɛlv/
verb
[no object]
1 Reach inside a receptacle and search for something.
1.1 Research or make painstaking inquiries into something.
2 archaic Dig; excavate.

Origin
Old English delfan ‘dig’, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch delven.

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We enjoy delving into slang, and we ask the question, "Can you dig it?" (Those who were around in the 1070s would say yes.)

megabucks

Pronunciation /ˈmɛɡəbʌks/
plural noun
informal
A very large amount of money.

==========

Marty managed to maintain his megabucks.
He accomplished that by owning trucks.
He hired only unionized drivers.
All were self-acknowledged strivers
Who helped to weed out lazy losers,
And they got the goods on time to users.

tink

Pronunciation /tɪŋk/
verb
[no object]Knitting
Undo a row of knitting one stitch at a time, in order to correct a mistake.

Origin
1990s reversal of knit.

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If you want to quickly tink
And make your hard work really shrink
Walk to the kitchen to get a drink
Leaving the knitting where the cat can get at it.


loanword

Pronunciation /ˈləʊnwəːd/
noun
A word adopted from a foreign language with little or no modification.

==========

I have always thought of "pajamas" (US) or "pyjamas" (UK) as a loanword. "The word pajama comes from the Hindi "pae jama" or "pai jama," meaning leg clothing."

(image on loan from Wikipedia)

hallowed

Pronunciation /ˈhaləʊd/
adjective
1 Made holy; consecrated.
1.1 Greatly revered and honored.

==========

If a priest says "Bless you!" when you sneeze, has he hallowed you?

dopester

Pronunciation /ˈdəʊpstə/
noun
informal North American
A person who collects and supplies information, typically on sporting events or elections.

==========

Dopesters are abundant on sports TV shows ahead of the American football weekends. They are not always right. Last night the Raiders won the game.

needful

Pronunciation
needful
/ˈniːdfʊl/ /ˈniːdf(ə)l/
adjective
1 formal Necessary; requisite.
2 dated Needy.

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James jumped jauntily but effectively because it was needful if he wished to cross the stream with dry feet.

thought-provoking

Pronunciation /ˈθɔːtprəvəʊkɪŋ/
adjective
Stimulating careful consideration or attention.

==========

I don't mean to provoke you on a Sunday, but there is nothing thought-provoking about this sentence.

sward

Pronunciation /swɔːd/
noun
1 literary An expanse of short grass.
2 Farming
The upper layer of soil, especially when covered with grass.

Origin
Old English sweard ‘skin’. The sense ‘upper layer of soil’ developed in late Middle English (at first in phrases such as sward of the earth).

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Puss-n-Boots won the award for carrying a sword with swagger across the sward.

Can I get a in here?

(from Friday...oops!)

formulate

Pronunciation /ˈfɔːmjʊleɪt/
verb
[with object]
1 Create or prepare methodically.
1.1 Express (an idea) in a concise or systematic way.

Origin
Mid 19th century from formula+ -ate, on the pattern of French formuler, from medieval Latin formulare.

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Frankly, these daily support sentences are not carefully formulated. Mostly the work goes into the associated clipart, and even then, not always.

memorize

Pronunciation /ˈmɛmərʌɪz/
verb
(British memorise)
[with object]
Commit to memory; learn by heart.

==========

Don't merely memorize vocabulary. Make it 'come alive' by regular, interesting, creative use.

He learned the songs by heart
But that was just the start
If you want to know the best part,
You'll need to hear him sing his chart.

sea change

Pronunciation
noun
1 A profound or notable transformation.
1.1 Australian A significant change in lifestyle, especially a move from the city to a rural or seaside location.

Origin
From Shakespeare's Tempest (I. ii. 403).

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For some, retirement is a sea change. In Australia, people choose to be seachangers. In the USA, many people decide to retire from a city or suburb to the shores of a place like Florida, combining the timing.

enthralling

Pronunciation
enthralling
/ɪnˈθrɔːlɪŋ/ /ɛnˈθrɔːlɪŋ/
adjective
Capturing and holding one's attention; fascinating.

==========

Of course, the goal is to be enthralling every day. Honestly though, I'm shooting for "not boring".

repmobile

Pronunciation /ˈrɛpməbiːl/
noun
informal, derogatory
A mid-range saloon car, typically used as a company car.

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The reality is that Jack drives his repmobile, an average sedan, but perfectly suitable to drive to a local bar for a liquid lunch with a client.


monoecious

Pronunciation /məˈniːʃəs/
adjective
Biology
(of a plant or invertebrate animal) having both the male and female reproductive organs in the same individual; hermaphrodite.
Compare with dioecious

Origin
Mid 18th century from modern Latin Monoecia (denoting a class of such plants in Linnaeus's system), from Greek monos ‘single’ + oikos ‘house’.

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The monoecious plant which most would say, "I know that plant." is corn.


pogonotomy

Pronunciation /ˌpəʊɡəˈnɒtəmi/
noun
The cutting of a beard; shaving.

Origin
Late 19th century; earliest use found in The Los Angeles Times. From ancient Greek πωγωνο-, combining form of πώγων beard + -tomy.

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Peter practices practical pogonotomy just once a week, in order to clear the stubble from his neck. The beard itself is not shaved, but merely trimmed.

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