mannerism

/ˈmanərɪz(ə)m/
noun
1 A habitual gesture or way of speaking or behaving.
1.1 Psychiatry An ordinary gesture or expression that becomes abnormal through exaggeration or repetition.
2 mass noun - Excessive use of a distinctive style in art, literature, or music.

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Bob was often accused of expressing himself with a mannerism, perhaps in a passive/aggressive way, through an exaggerated shrug.

delicious

/dɪˈlɪʃəs/
adjective
1 Highly pleasant to the taste.
1.1 Delightful.

Origin
Middle English (also in the sense ‘characterized by sensuous indulgence’): via Old French from late Latin deliciosus, from Latin deliciae (plural) ‘delight, pleasure’.

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Recipes reveal resplendent riches
Tasty tarts, tremendous treats
Delectable, delightful, delicious dishes
Egregiously elegant, extravagant eats.

jazzy

/ˈdʒazi/
adjective jazzier, jazziest
1 Of, resembling, or in the style of jazz.
2 Bright, colorful, and showy.

==========-

Joe performed with pizazz and finesse even though his outfits were never jazzy.

brilliant

/ˈbrɪlj(ə)nt/
adjective
1 (of light or colour) very bright.
2 Exceptionally clever or talented.
2.1 Outstanding; impressive.
3 British informal Excellent; marvellous.
as exclamation ‘‘Brilliant!’ he declared excitedly’
noun
A diamond of brilliant cut.

Origin
Late 17th century from French brillant ‘shining’,

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The dawn now past was brilliant. Clouds dominate in advance of forecast snow.

glassware

/ˈɡlɑːswɛː/
noun
mass noun
Ornaments and articles made from glass.

==========

Bob's parents operated a store in Chicago which specialized in fine china and glassware.

dainty

/ˈdeɪnti/
adjective daintier, daintiest
1 Delicately small and pretty.
1.1 (of a person) delicate and graceful in build or movement.
1.2 (of food) particularly good to eat and served in a small portion.
2 Fastidious, especially concerning food.
noun dainties
Something good to eat; a delicacy.

Origin
Middle English (as noun): from Old French daintie

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Doreen, daintiest damsel
Killed her prize pig
So she could ham, sell.
A small silly, not big.

brawn

/brɔːn/
noun
mass noun
Physical strength in contrast to intelligence.

Origin
Middle English from Old French braon ‘fleshy part of the leg’, of Germanic origin; related to German Braten ‘roast meat’.

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Bodybuilders are judged almost exclusively on their brawn.

intoxicated

/ɪnˈtɒksɪkeɪtɪd/
adjective
Drunk or under the influence of drugs.

==========

Bob's work was just belated.
He adamantly stated.
Though his skills may be overrated,
He denies he was intoxicated.

avow

/əˈvaʊ/
verb
reporting verb
Assert or confess openly.
with clause ‘he avowed that he had voted Labour in every election’
with object ‘he avowed his change of faith’

Origin
Middle English (in the senses ‘acknowledge, approve’ and ‘vouch for’): from Old French avouer ‘acknowledge’, from Latin advocare ‘summon in defence’ (see avouch).

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I avow that this word is being posted late for the second day in a row.

doughy

/ˈdəʊi/
adjective doughier, doughiest
1 (of food) having a thick, malleable consistency.
1.1 (of a person) pale and rather fat.

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Joe had plenty of loot
Though he rarely wore a suit.
A little too long, his hair he let grow.
And his belly was doughy, you know.

hallucinate

/həˈluːsɪneɪt/
verb
[no object]
Experience a seemingly real perception of something not actually present, typically as a result of a mental disorder or of taking drugs.

Origin
from Greek alussein ‘be uneasy or distraught’.

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Though others think him sleazy
And find he makes them queasy,
George, himself, finds it easy,
In his unstable state,
To regularly hallucinate
That he is really great!

shanty

/ˈʃanti/
noun shanties
A small, crudely built shack.

Origin
Early 19th century (originally a North American usage): perhaps from Canadian French chantier ‘lumberjack's cabin, logging camp’.

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Bob and his beloved Aunty.
Lived in a wretched shanty.
In sad reality, though,
It's just a badly built tiny house, you know.

half-and-half

adverb
In two equal parts.
adjective
Consisting of equal parts of one thing and another.
noun
mass noun North American
A mixture of milk and cream.

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He happily ate a half-and-half mix of hot and cold cereal on which he put half-and-half.

jiffy

/ˈdʒɪfi/
noun
informal in singular
A very short time; a moment.

Origin
Late 18th century of unknown origin.

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Sometimes a word of the day takes just a jiffy. Of course, the illustration might run on longer.

practical

/ˈpraktɪk(ə)l/ [prak-tih-cul]
adjective
1 Of or concerned with the actual doing or use of something rather than with theory and ideas.
2 (of an idea, plan, or method) likely to succeed or be effective in real circumstances; feasible.

Origin
from Greek praktikos ‘concerned with action’, from prattein ‘do, act’) + -al.

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It is good for you to practice
Well known, effective praxis.
It is also very practical
And seen as highly tactical.

imperil

/ɪmˈpɛrɪl/ /ɪmˈpɛr(ə)l/ [im-pair-ill]
verb - imperils, imperilling, imperilled; US imperiling, imperiled
[with object]
Put at risk of being harmed, injured, or destroyed.

Origin
Late Middle English from peril, probably on the pattern of endanger.

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Aloysius avoided imperiling his sanity the only way he knew how.

retrospect

/ˈrɛtrəspɛkt/ [reh-trow-spekt]
'noun
A survey or review of a past course of events or period of time.
Phrases
in retrospect
When looking back on a past event or situation; with hindsight.

Origin
Early 17th century from retro-‘back’, on the pattern of the noun prospect.

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Retrospect

No need for a parade
To look back on a decade.
Just look over your shoulder;
You're now ten years older.

hopscotch

/ˈhɒpskɒtʃ/ [hop-scotch]
noun
mass noun
A children's game in which each child by turn hops into and over squares marked on the ground to retrieve a marker thrown into one of these squares.
verb
North American no object, with adverbial of direction
Travel from place to place.

Origin
Early 19th century from hop+ scotch.

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Hank hurled the marker and quickly jumped into action on the hopscotch grid drawn by his neighbor's daughter.

garish

/ˈɡɛːrɪʃ/ [gare-ish]
Obtrusively bright and showy; lurid.
‘garish shirts in all sorts of colours’

Origin

Mid 16th century of unknown origin.

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Bob attempted to design a subdued flag for the parish of Garish on Maine.

consist

/kənˈsɪst/
verb
[no object]
1 consist of - Be composed or made up of.
1.1 consist in - Have as an essential feature.
2 consist with - archaic Be consistent with.

Origin
from con- ‘together’ + sistere ‘stand (still)’.

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I must insist, Love
I shall resist, Dove.
So don't be pissed at.
Words this rhyme consists of.

Because of last night's guzzle
Don't try to put a muzzle,
On silly words like "fuzzle"
You know this rhyme's a puzzle.

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