Algot is a user on mastodon.art. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse.

Algot @Algot@mastodon.art

Word of the Day

basho

/ˈbaʃəʊ/
noun
A sumo wrestling tournament.

Origin
Japanese, from ba ‘place, occasion’ + shō ‘place, locality’.

==========

Marco took a break from the World Cup tournament by visiting a basho on his Asian trip.

He was surprised to find the wrestlers were having their own difficulty concentrating.

Fathers Day Gift

Garden Gnome with shirt and wire frame glasses customized by my son to look more like me.

But, I'm a KDE groupie!

Sunday Sillies -Wicked Wonderful Wordies -

Idioms or common phrases (American/English) are represented by the position, shape or arrangement of words in or around a square.

Can you figure out this week's wordie? It would be wicked wonderful if you can.

Please use CW to submit your answers, thanks. Give everybody the chance to guess.

Hint: just some

Word of the Day

impudent

/ˈɪmpjʊd(ə)nt/
adjective
Not showing due respect for another person; impertinent.

Origin
Late Middle English (in the sense ‘immodest, indelicate’): from Latin impudent-, from in- ‘not’ + pudent- ‘ashamed, modest’ (from pudere ‘be ashamed’).

==========

Don't be impudent.
You know you owe the rent.
Give it to me now or
Before you know it's spent.

Word of the Day

toxic

/ˈtɒksɪk/
adjective
1 Poisonous.
1.1 Relating to or caused by poison.
1.2 Very bad, unpleasant, or harmful.
2 Finance - Denoting or relating to debt which has a high risk of default.

==========

Tina rode past the lava flow which outgassed toxic fumes. She stayed at a distance, and carefully upwind. An active volcano's eerie beauty can be lethal in many ways.

Word of the Day

multiplicand

/ˌmʌltɪplɪˈkand//ˈmʌltɪplɪˌkand/
noun
A quantity which is to be multiplied by another (the multiplier).

Origin
Late 16th century: from medieval Latin multiplicandus ‘to be multiplied’, gerundive of Latin multiplicare (see multiply).

==========

Honestly, I have trouble telling the multiplicand and multiplier apart, especially considering that pesky commutative property, you know.

Word of the Day

glitterati

/ˌɡlɪtəˈrɑːti/
plural noun
informal
The fashionable set of people engaged in show business or some other glamorous activity.

Origin
1950s (originally US): blend of glitter and literati.

==========

Though WotD groupies may be more impressed with literati, a small bit of attention might be set aside for appreciating glitterati.

These are my website cookies, for what it's worth.

Word of the Day

augur

/ˈɔːɡə/
verb
[no object]augur well/badly/ill
1 (of an event or circumstance) portend a good or bad outcome.

Usage
The spellings augur (a verb meaning ‘portend a good or bad outcome’, as in this augurs well) and auger (a type of tool used for boring) are sometimes confused,

==========

Augustus averred that the oracle's pronouncement augured well for the planned making of holes with the auger.

Weed/Wildflower Wednesday

This week, so many beauties have appeared before my lens that it is necessary to post several times for weed/wildflower Wednesday.

The summer is approaching and these spring visitors will be gone before you can go to look for them in your own neighborhoods (some won't be there, of course because not all citizens of the fediverse are not all in New England).

Henbit dead-nettle _Lamium_amplexicaule_ is an edible lawn weed.

Weed/Wildflower Wednesday

Forget-me-not *Myosotis sp.*

Five petaled fowers are small, less than a centimeter across in a tall spike.

(Apologies for the generally blurry phone photo - photographer's error)

Weed/Wildflower Wednesday

Poor-man's Pepperweed *Lepidium virginicum* has a flower that it is overlooked in favor of the quickly developing seeds in the spike below the still blooming white flowers.

Leaves and seedpods edible, with the latter having a peppery taste giving the plant it's common name.

Weed/Wildflower Wednesday

Buttercup, a wildflower *Ranunculus sp.* which may crop up in lawns is notable for it's yellow, shiny-surfaced petals.

Holding a buttercup under the chin is a child's game to test if you like butter.

Word of the Day

toggle switch

/ˈtɒɡ(ə)l/
noun
1 An electric switch operated by means of a projecting lever that is moved up and down.
2 Computing
another term for toggle

Origin
Mid 18th century (originally in nautical use): of unknown origin.

==========

I find myself on and off again about toggle switches.

The recent discussion of "schlep" was great. Special thanks to
@devorah who pointed out the long haul nature of the word.

It seemed that a revised image might add to the idea (thanks to today's "anergy" image.


Word of the Day

anergy

/ˈanədʒi/
noun
mass noun
Medicine
Absence of the normal immune response to a particular antigen or allergen.

Origin
Early 20th century: from German Anergie, from Greek an- ‘not’, on the pattern of Allergie ‘allergy’.

==========

Sally sallied forth to face the day. It wasn't too long before she wound down because her anergy quickly drained her energy.

Sunday Sillies -Wicked Wonderful Wordies -

Idioms or common phrases (American/English) are represented by the position, shape or arrangement of words in or around a square.

Can you figure out this week's wordie puzzle? It would be wicked wonderful if you can.

Please use CW to submit your answers, thanks. Give everybody the chance to guess.

Hint: couple

Word of the Day

frazil

/ˈfreɪz(ə)l/
(also frazil ice)
noun
mass noun
North American
Soft or amorphous ice formed by the accumulation of ice crystals in water that is too turbulent to freeze solid.

Origin
Late 19th century: from Canadian French frasil ‘snow floating in the water’

==========

Coming back to the mooring, Tony was glad there was only frazil ice that his boat could pass through. Soon he'd be pulling the boat out of the water before the inner harbor froze solid.

Word of the Day

acentric

/eɪˈsɛntrɪk/
adjective
1 Without a centre; not centralized.
1.1 Genetics (of a chromosome) having no centromere.

==========

It did not bother Tom in the least that the donut was acentric. It was how donuts had "always" been.