azygous

/ˈazɪɡəs/
adjective
Biology Anatomy
(of an organic structure) single; not existing in pairs.

Origin
Mid 19th century: from Greek azugos ‘unyoked’ (compare with azygos vein) + -ous.

==========

Lungs and kidneys come in pairs, but there is only one stomach. It is azygous.

impish

/ˈɪmpɪʃ/

adjective
Inclined to do slightly naughty things for fun; mischievous.

Origin
Old English impa, impe ‘young shoot, scion’, impian ‘to graft’, based on Greek emphuein ‘to implant’. In late Middle English, the noun denoted a descendant, especially of a noble family, and later a child of the devil or a person regarded as such; hence a ‘little devil’ or mischievous child
==========

Todd was impish,
A little scamp.
He rode his skateboard
Down the busy ramp.

pusillanimous

/ˌpjuːsɪˈlanɪməs/
adjective
Showing a lack of courage or determination; timid.

Origin
Late Middle English: from ecclesiastical Latin pusillanimis (translating Greek oligopsukhos), from pusillus ‘very small’ + animus ‘mind’, + -ous.

==========

Um, yes, I am certain, positive, sure. I am pusillanimous, I think, maybe.


slaughter

/ˈslɔːtə/
verb
1 Kill (animals) for food.
1.1 Kill (people or animals) in a cruel or violent way, large numbers.
1.2 informal Defeat (an opponent) thoroughly.
noun
mass noun
1 The killing of animals for food.
1.1 The killing of a large number of people or animals in a cruel or violent way.
1.2 informal count noun A thorough defeat.

Origin
from Old Norse slátr ‘butcher's meat’; related to slay.

=====

See before you the site of significant slaughter.

clepsydra

/ˈklɛpsɪdrə/
noun
An ancient time-measuring device worked by a flow of water.

Origin
Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek klepsudra, based on kleptein ‘steal’ + hudōr ‘water’.

==========

By the time of the Greeks, water clocks, then called a clepsydra, had progressed to having time indicator dials to mark intervals during the day or night.

o-o

/ˈəʊəʊ/
(also oo)
noun
A honeyeater (bird) found in Hawaii, now probably extinct, which had a thin curved bill and climbed about on tree trunks.
Genus Moho, family Meliphagidae
Compare with ou

Origin
Late 19th century: from Hawaiian.

==========

Oh, oh! That wasn't an o'o, was it? I thought the species was extinct.

It looks like there are at least two different idiom/phrases that work with today's puzzle.

Remember to CW or DM all answers to let everyone have their own shot at a solution.

blunderbuss

/ˈblʌndəbʌs/
noun
1 historical A short large-bored gun firing balls or slugs.
2 An action or way of doing something regarded as lacking in subtlety and precision.

Origin
Mid 17th century: alteration (by association with blunder) of Dutch donderbus, literally ‘thunder gun’.

==========

A blunderbuss is not suitable for long range accuracy.

Wicked Wonderful Wordies

Idioms or common phrases (American/English) are represented by the position, shape or arrangement of words in or around a square.

Can you figure out this week's wordie? It would be wicked wonderful if you can.

Please use CW/DM to submit your answers, thanks. Give everybody the chance to guess.

Hint: beyond expectations

tetrad

/ˈtɛtrad/
noun
technical
A group or set of four.

Origin
Mid 17th century: from Greek tetras, tetrad- ‘four, a group of four’.

==========

The Kingston Trio was one singer short of a quartet, technically a triad, not a tetrad.

isagogics

/ˌʌɪsəˈɡɒdʒɪks/
plural noun
treated as singular Introductory study, especially of the literary and external history of the Bible prior to exegesis.

Origin
Mid 19th century: plural of isagogic, via Latin from Greek eisagōgikos, from eisagōgē ‘introduction’, from eis ‘into’ + agein ‘to lead’.

==========

Flipping through the WotD might be considered isagogics prior to a thorough examination of the unabridged dictionary.

crocket

/ˈkrɒkɪt/
noun
(in Gothic architecture) a small carved ornament, typically a bud or curled leaf, on the inclined side of a pinnacle, arch, etc.

Origin
Middle English (denoting a curl or roll of hair):

==========

Calvin carved the crocket with the chisel from his pocket.

valorize
(British valorise)

/ˈvalərʌɪz/
verb
[with object]
1 Give or ascribe value or validity to.
1.1 Raise or fix the price or value of (a commodity or currency) by artificial means, especially by government action.

Origin
(from French valorisation, from valeur ‘value’).

==========

The value of this word is one "million", so naturally I'm going to valorize it at two "million" so I can make a profit. (Considering the lack of monetary unit, you are free to assign your own.)

polemic

/pəˈlɛmɪk/
noun
1 A strong verbal or written attack on someone or something.
mass noun ‘a writer of feminist polemic’
1.1 usually polemics The practice of engaging in controversial debate or dispute.

Origin
Mid 17th century: via medieval Latin from Greek polemikos, from polemos ‘war’.

==========

I need to ask, is it logical to launch a harsh polemic against war?

I hope I will connect with at least four people by posting this toot.



coffret

/ˈkɒfrɪt/
noun
A small box or container.

Origin
Late 15th century: from Old French, ‘small chest’, diminutive of coffre (see coffer).

==========

Martin carried the coffret
In a corner of his pocket,
Inside of which, a locket.
To his girlfriend he would offer it.

Wicked Wonderful Wordies

Idioms or common phrases (American/English) are represented by the position, shape or arrangement of words in or around a square.

Can you figure out this week's wordie? It would be wicked wonderful if you can.

Please use CW/DM to submit your answers, thanks. Give everybody the chance to guess.

Hint:similar to "sept d'un coup"

batik

/bəˈtiːk//ˈbatɪk/
noun
mass noun
1 A method (originally used in Java) of producing coloured designs on textiles by dyeing them, having first applied wax to the parts to be left undyed.
as modifier ‘batik scarves’
1.1 Cloth that has been dyed using the batik method.

Origin
Late 19th century: from Javanese, literally ‘painted’.

==========

Bob built batik block patterns with his wax applicator before dying the cloth dark blue.

@Poulet

Thank you for connecting.

I doubt my cat photos will ever compete with yours.

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